Goliad

My next piece of travel takes us to Goliad State Park, where Hops and I did some hiking

Hops on the state park’s nature trail

and he got into some ants, I think they must have been, and was very sad about his feet for a little while but got over it… I wonder if he needs some little booties?

And we checked out the Mission Espiritu Santo, there on the grounds of the state park (sorry no pics) and then the Presidio la Bahía, just up the road. This presidio is an important part of Texas history, the site of one of the decisive battles during the war of Texas Independence. Some 342 men were killed here as prisoners of war, including James Fannin. I enjoyed walking the grounds and reading the plaques; Hops enjoyed being allowed to accompany.

Presidio la Bahía
I would like a window seat like this. When I’m not in the van.

We also saw the Angel of Goliad statue, commemorating a Mexican woman, Francita Alavez, who advocated for the men who were slated to be killed, saving dozens by hiding them and spiriting them away.

Angel of Goliad

The presidio also turns out to be the birthplace of General Ignacio Zaragoza, who defeated Napoleon II on May 5, 1862 in an important victory for Mexico that is the source of the holiday now celebrated as Cinco de Mayo. His time at Presidio la Bahía was brief; his parents were living there when he was born (1829) and then moved on, so that it is sort of a freak coincidence that the presidio serves as an important place in both the histories of Texas and Mexico during Texas independence, and again in Mexican history through the birth of Zaragoza.

We had good hikes and a nice quiet campsite at Goliad, and I got some schoolwork and work-work done. But there’s always someplace new to go…